Cuauhtémoc Medina in Conversation

Launched in 1996 and now in its twelfth edition, the Shanghai Biennale is the longest-running biennial in China, presented at the Power Station of Art, China's only government-funded art space in a landscape dominated by private museums. This year's edition (10 November 2018–10 March 2019), curated by Mexican-born Cuauhtémoc Medina, brings together the work of…

Beyond Bliss in Bangkok

    There has been a huge proliferation of biennales in recent years, with nearly 250 biennials currently operating globally, listed by the Biennial Foundation’s Directory of Biennials. They have become a marker of a must-see modern city, a showing off of soft power, a rapacious consumption of culture and a drawcard for cultural tourism.…

Robert Rauschenberg: ‘Vydocks’

The “enfant terrible of the New York school”, as poet Frank O’Hara dubbed Robert Rauschenberg, reshaped 20th-century American art and left behind a boundary-breaking body of work characterised by experimentation and unorthodox use of different media. His early works, made in the 1950s and 60s, featured composites of found objects – bottles, a taxidermy goat head, newspapers, chairs, rubber…

Shows to see in Hong Kong: The Lowdown

Published on ocula From Cao Fei's first large-scale institutional exhibition in Asia, to a showing of historical works by Robert Rauschenberg, Ocula contributor Diana d'Arenberg offers her lowdown of shows to see in Hong Kong this autumn. Cao Fei: A hollow in a world too full Tai Kwun Contemporary, 10 Hollywood Rd, Central 8 September…

Gert and Uwe Tobias at Ben Brown Gallery

During the Ottoman invasion of Wallachia in 1462,  Sultan Mehmed II– who had marched into the territory with an army of more than 150,000 troops–entered the small town of Târgoviste, in what is today known as Romania, to find a forest of twenty thousand Turkish men, women, and children, all impaled. The perpetrator; voivode Vlad III…

Catherine Opie: ‘So long as they are wild’

Describing herself as a 'kind of twisted social documentary photographer', American photographer Catherine Opie has an affection for subcultures. Inspired by the photographs of Lewis Hine, the Ohio-born Opie picked up the camera at age nine and immediately began photographing friends and her community.  Her early series Being and Having (1991) and Portraits (1993—1997) mixed traditional portrait photography with less…

Interview: Izumi Kato

  A row of 12 colourful creatures cast shadows behind a blue wall in Perrotin Gallery Hong Kong. A series of paintings–large and small–fill up the other wall spaces, but it is these creatures, which from a distance resemble ethnographic tribal sculptures, that catch your eye. Closer up, extra-terrestrial looking, round painted mouths, and big…