A Visit to Kanaal

Previous years have seen Belgian collector, art and antiquities dealer, gallerist and celebrated designer, Axel Vervoordt, stage some of the most beautiful exhibitions during the Venice Biennale at the Palazzo Fortuny.  Filled with works from his collection –– paintings by Gutai and Dansaekwa masters Kazuo Shiraga and Yun Hyong-Keun, Ghanaian artist El Anatsui, as well... Continue Reading →

Chen Danqing at Tang Contemporary

Shanghai-born artist Chen Danqing was only 14 when he started painting Mao propaganda posters in the 1970s. “I painted more than 100 portraits of Chairman Mao on the street walls in Shanghai and its suburbs and also on factory iron sheets,” he says. “During that time, there were millions of amateur and professional painters in... Continue Reading →

The Violence of Gender: Performing Society

The Violence of Gender: Performing Society, at Tai Kwun Contemporary, Tai Kwun Centre for Heritage and Arts, Hong Kong Installation view: Raphaela Vogel, Uterusland, 2017. Tai Kwun Contemporary, 2019 In the wake of the #metoo movement, where power, activism, feminism and gender collide, a new exhibition at Tai Kwun Contemporary at Hong Kong's Tai Kwun Centre... Continue Reading →

Contagious Cities: Faraway Too Close

Contagious Cities: Faraway Too Close 26 January - 21 April, 2019 Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong In 2003, the SARS outbreak led to a shutdown of Hong Kong. The virus infected 1,755 people in the city, killing 299. Fear of the epidemic led many, mainly expats, to flee. Those who didn’t leave avoided public spaces. A... Continue Reading →

Art Basel Hong Kong 2019: A Post-Mortem

Lee Bul, Willing to be Vulnerable–Metalized Balloon,  2019 at Encounters. Art Basel HK 2019 If with the advent of Artificial Intelligence, and the concomitant displacement of jobs that ensues, only those servicing the über wealthy will remain employed, then it would appear that the art world, with its numerous advisors, dealers, collection managers and specialists catering... Continue Reading →

Interview: Matthew Day Jackson

Day Jackson's is a multifaceted practice, encompassing sculpture, paintings, printing, collage, photography, video, installation, and performance. His work traverses histories while repurposing symbols of American culture, such as Disney figures, atomic bombs, and Life magazine covers.

SEA Focus and Singapore Art Week

Art fairs are like the Hydra—chop one head off and several more sprout up in its place. This month saw the inauguration of two new fairs in Asia alone, with Taipei Dangdai kicking off in the third week of January, followed by S.E.A. Focus the very next week in Singapore (24–27 January 2019). February also... Continue Reading →

Kader Attia: Héroes Heridos

It is perhaps fitting that French-born Algerian artist Kader Attia is based in Berlin, a city of scars. A city where the ruins of a wall that once divided it are still visible; a city in which the atrocities committed during wars and by two repressive regimes are memorialised; where the architecture of communism and... Continue Reading →

Cuauhtémoc Medina in Conversation

Launched in 1996 and now in its twelfth edition, the Shanghai Biennale is the longest-running biennial in China, presented at the Power Station of Art, China's only government-funded art space in a landscape dominated by private museums. This year's edition (10 November 2018–10 March 2019), curated by Mexican-born Cuauhtémoc Medina, brings together the work of... Continue Reading →

Beyond Bliss in Bangkok

    There has been a huge proliferation of biennales in recent years, with nearly 250 biennials currently operating globally, listed by the Biennial Foundation’s Directory of Biennials. They have become a marker of a must-see modern city, a showing off of soft power, a rapacious consumption of culture and a drawcard for cultural tourism.... Continue Reading →

Robert Rauschenberg: ‘Vydocks’

The “enfant terrible of the New York school”, as poet Frank O’Hara dubbed Robert Rauschenberg, reshaped 20th-century American art and left behind a boundary-breaking body of work characterised by experimentation and unorthodox use of different media. His early works, made in the 1950s and 60s, featured composites of found objects – bottles, a taxidermy goat head, newspapers, chairs, rubber... Continue Reading →

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